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Featured Posts, France - Paris, Gastronomy

Yam’Tcha – The Best Chinese-French Fusion Cuisine in Paris

February 8, 2012

Yam’Tcha

Adeline Grattard worked at the kitchen.

Before owning her restaurant Yam’Tcha, Adeline Grattard had her training at the Hotel Scribe (during Yannick  Alleno’s era) and then l’Astrance (Pascal Barbot).   The later which influenced her cuisine and skills deeply.  After l’Astrance, she went to Hong Kong to learn Chinese cuisine.  She worked at BO Innovation (Michelin 2 stars restaurant in Hong Kong) around 2 years.  By all these experiences, she’s absolutely well trained in both Chinese and French cuisines.   Every time I dined there, I was surprised how much she has sharpened her cooking skills again.   Her husband, Chi Wah, masters the tea, which is essential to the spirit of “Yam’Tcha” (Yam’Tcha means drink tea in Chinese).  He goes to China frequently in order to source the best tea to match Adeline’s cuisine.  Here, you can experience the most inspiring example of the “marriage” of the food & tea.

If you asked me where to have the best Chinese food in Paris, I’ll tell you – “ Yam’Tcha”.   Although it might not be that authentic as the Chinese food you would have in China, Hong Kong, or Taiwan, it’s definitely worth to go.

Chef:  Adeline Grattard
Add: 
4 rue Sauval, 75001 Paris, FRANCE
Tel: + +33 1 40 26 08 07
Closed Monday and Tuesday

To see more photos I took at Yam’Tcha – Please check my Flickr album- Yam’Tcha Nov. 11, 2011.

Tea – The must company for Adeline’s cuisine

Green Amuse Bouche

Foie gras – Bulots – Choucroute au vin jaune chinois.

Turbot de ligne au riz noir

Champagne is also a very good company for Adeline’s cuisine. 🙂

Volaille

Dessert

To see more photos I took at Yam’Tcha – Please check my Flickr album- Yam’Tcha Nov. 11, 2011.

France - Paris, Gastronomy

A recent meal at l’Arpège

August 27, 2011

The new page of my gastronomic journey in Q3 was started at l’Arpège yesterday, a Michelin 3 star restaurant led by Alain Passard. Alain has been considered one of the greatest chefs in France since the late 20th century. There are 2 persons who I would like to highlight here, because of them, I got the chance to know about l’Arpège and Alain. The first person is FoodSnob (foodsnobblog.wordpress.com) who told me again and again how he fell in love with l’Arpège. The other one is Dr. FC (restaurantaddict.blogspot.com), definitely one of the most knowledgeable gourmets (but very low-profile) I’ve ever met so far.

I believe it’s not difficult at all to find out more information about either l’Arpège or Alain Passard via the powerful Google. Then, I’ll pass this task to it.

The images will talk. So, please enjoy the photo show as follows –

The aperitif - Champagne Billecart-Salmon Extra Brut

The Radis

2009 Weingut Knoll Grüner Veltliner Federspiel Kreutles

The gaspacho

L'Amuse-bouche - The little vegetable delight

L'Amuse-Bouche - The little vegetable delight

La Gratinée d'oignons avec des citrons confits

The green salad of cucumber & melon

The sea bass carpaccio

The haricot, white peach, and basil mousse

The tagliatelles

The tomato cubes with honey sauce

The exquisite vegetables raviolis

The transparent "gnocchis" made by tomato cubes wrapped with sliced cucumbers

The tomato salad with the raspberry sauce

Nothing more than a decoration...

A smart knife stand

Le homard des îles Chausey - The lobster from the island Chausey

Le homard des îles Chausey - The lobster from the island Chausey

L'agneau - the lamb

2007 Domaine Jean Foillard - Morgon "Côte du Py"

La tarte feuilletée aux pêches et dragées - The peach pie

Les petits fours chez Arpège

l’Arpège (map)
84, rue de Varenne
75007 Paris
Tel:  +33 (0) 1 47 05 09 06
Fax: +33 (0) 1 44 18 98 39
E:  arpege.passard@wanadoo.fr
www.alain-passard.com 

Bistros, France - Paris, Gastronomy

My favorite bistros in Paris

September 6, 2009

My favorite bistros in Paris

Here, I’ve listed 11 bistros I like very much in Paris. I tended to make the info brief rather than detailed, for those people who need a quick review. I’ve also uploaded a lot of photos to my Flickr albums which might be helpful as a reference.

Price range –
Lunch set – 30€ to 40€
Dinner – 30€ to 60€

Paris 75001

Les Fines Gueules

Check my report about Les Fines Gueules.

Hours:  Open 7 days for lunch and dinner.  Bar hour till late night.
Address:  43 Rue Croix des Petits Champs, Paris 75001 (Map)
Metro:  Palais Royal, Bourse, Sentier, or Pyramide
Tel :  +33 1 42 61 35 41
Flickr Photo Set

 

 

Yam’Tcha

YamTcha

Yam’Tcha

Just started in this year, Yam’Tcha has been a big hit in Paris. Every gourmand friend of mine is talking about it. I went it once this summer and found it intriguing. The female chef Adeline Grattard has an impressive resume: worked with Yannick Alléeno at the Hotel and Pascal Barbot at L’Astrance-l’Astrance in Paris and then spent 2 years working in Hong Kong, including at the restaurant BO. IMO, her cuisine is full of Asian touch, the presentation is very French however. Please make a reservation as early as possible.

Open Hours:   Wednesdays to Sundays
Add: 4 rue Sauval, Paris 75001  (Map)
Metro:  Louvre Rivoli
Tel: +33 1 40 26 08 07
Flickr Photo Set


Paris 75004

Benoit

Benoit

Benoit

Founded in 1912, Benoit has kept its well-known traditional cuisine well till now. It’s a bistro very comfortable and very Parisian. Benoit has been acquired by Alain Ducasse Group in 2005 from the ex-proprietor Petit family. It’s a Michelin one star restaurant, but the price is pretty fair – lunch set costs 38€ and a la carte at dinner costs around 60€. Delicious food and cheerful ambiance.

Open Hours: Mondays to Sundays. Annual closed: July 26th to August 25th and Feburary 25th to March 2nd.
Add: 20, Rue St-Martin, Paris 75004  (Map)
Metro:  Chatelet or Hotel de Ville
Tel: +33 1 42 72 25 76
Flickr Photo Set
http://www.esprit-bistrot.com/

Paris 75005

Ribouldinque

Ribouldingue

Ribouldingue

The owner Nadège Varigny had worked with Yves Camdeborde for around 10 years before. It’s a place for those who love offals (les abats): Instines, tripe, cheeks, tongues, kidneys, and the rest. The wine list is a very brief but well selected one. The food is hearty and yummy.

Open Hours: Tuesdays to Saturdays. Annual closed: From Aug 9 to Aug 31 and December 27th to January 4th.
Add: 10 Rue St-Julien le Pauvre, Paris 75005  (Map)
Metro: Saint-Michel, Cluny La Sorbonne, or Maubert Mutualite
Tel: +33 1 46 33 98 80
Flickr Photo Set

Itineraire

Itineraires

Itineraires

The chef Sylvain Sendrais is from the famous bistro le Temps en Temps. The interior deco is very modern and bright. The service is inviting and friendly. The food here is delicious and contemporary. Of course, make sure that you book a table in advance.

Open Hours: Tuesdays to Saturdays. Annual closed: From Aug 4 to Aug. 25 and December 20th to 29th.
Add: 5, Rue de Pontoise, Paris 75005  (Map)
Metro: Maubert Mutualite
Tel: +33 1 46 33 60 11
Flickr Photo Set

Continue Reading…

France - Paris, Gastronomy, Wine

Les Fines Gueules

August 5, 2009

Les Fines Gueules

During the last 2 months of my stay in France, Les Fines Gueules became one of my favorite venues to stop by – for a drink and for the good food.   The dynamic owner/manager Arnaud Bradol is an enthusiastic fan of bio-wine, or so called “natural wine”.  He is also fanatical about top food ingredients.  Here, he features the best suppliers including – Hugo Desnoyer for beef and veal, Jean-Yves Bordier for butter, Joël Thiébault for vegetables, Poujauran for bread.   Plus, the cave under the restaurant is another thing to make you “wow”.  More than thousands of wines are quietly lying there.

The restaurant is located in a building that used to belong to la Banque de France.   The building is elegant and tells its own history.   Nevertheless, when you walk in the restaurant, you don’t feel it is like other traditional wine bars or bistros in Paris – the interior design is a nicely calibrated mixture of contemporary and vintage touches.

There are no printed menus or wine lists.  They bring you a menu/wine list written on blackboards instead.  For the menu, I found they change the dishes quite frequently, but you can always find their signature dishes –

Assortiment de Charcuteries Fines

Assortiment de Charcuteries Fines

Entrée

  • Assortiment de Charcuteries Fines
  • Carpaccio de Veau élevé sous la mère, parmesan bio 36 mois et huile d’olive extra vierge
Fameux Tartare de Limousine au couteau grenailles et salade

Fameux Tartare de Limousine au couteau grenailles et salade

Plat

  • Fameux Tartare de Limousine au couteau grenailles et salade
  • *Its carré d’agneau and fish dishes are also very good and worth a try.

So, about the wine, oui…!  If you didn’t try any wine here, you would leave feeling VERY sorry to yourself.  The first time I visited Les Fines Gueules with friends, Arnaud brought us a red wine which had been put in a decanter.   The first nose of the wine to me was eucalyptus, very fresh and quite spicy.  It’s so unique and intriguing.  The taste was also full of spices; the texture was pretty round.  It’s like a breeze gently brushing your cheek during summertime when drinking this wine.   It was not easy for me to figure out the region this wine belongs to.  I would guess it’s from the south France, maybe la Corse?  Or Languedoc-Roussillon?

Le Petit Domaine de Gimios Rouge Fruit

Le Petit Domaine de Gimios Rouge Fruit

Finally, Arnaud brought the bottle to us, it’s a domaine called Le Petit Domaine de Gimios which produces only nature wine, no sulphur or SO2 added at all.   Plus, the vines here are all very old vines.  It is run by a 60+ year old woman named Anne Marie Lavaysse, who insists on using the most natural and organic methods for taking care of her vineyard. She maintains very low yield, which is only 10~14 hectolitres per hectare (hl/ha).  The grape variety of this wine Rouge Fruit contains Cinsault, Alicante, Grenache, Carignan, Aramon, and Muscat.   Besides this wine, I was also lucky enough to be comp’d with a glass of 1975 Château Pichon Comtesse de Lalande.  It was just splendid…!

At Les Fines Gueules, the wines are always full of surprises (good ones, of course) and the food is promising. Very relaxing and cheerful ambiance.  Free live Jazz concerts are performed here from time to time on Sundays.

Les Fines Gueules satisfies those with good palates and good tastes.  A truly cool place for those Hao Kou Fu people.

Les Fines Gueules
Address – 43 Rue Croix des Petits Champs, Paris 75001
TEL – +33 1 42 61 35 41
Hours –  Open 7 days for lunch and dinner.  Bar hour till late night.
Metro – Palais Royal, Bourse, Sentier, or Pyramide



More photos –

Featured Posts, France - Paris, Gastronomy

l’Ambroisie, la cuisine qui vient d’un grand coeur – Part II

October 27, 2008
l’Ambroisie, la cuisine qui vient d’un grand coeur
Part II
The dining room of l'Ambroisie

The dining room of l’Ambroisie

MY SECOND MEAL (Wakako’s Birthday Lunch)
The 2nd time I went to l’Ambroisie was February, 2008 for my friend Wakako’s birthday.  This is late into and at the height of black truffle season, and Pacaud has an unparalleled reputation for sourcing the best black truffles and preparing them to perfection.  Wasn’t I lucky?!
Because of my Facebook Group connection to Mathieu Pacaud, he was waiting for us at the entrance when Wakako and I arrived.  So exciting!  Before we started our meal, he proposed to show us the “core” of l’Ambroisie – the kitchen, and of course, my favorite part – the cave.  Compared with the kitchens of Ledoyen and Les Crayers, the kitchen of l’Ambroisie is incredibly small!  I was quite shocked that they could run in that way.  Mathieu then took out a box and showed us all of the black truffles inside!  He said the quality of black truffles that season wasn’t good, but they tried to find the best ones.  (Of course, it’s l’Ambroisie!)  He told us that they had to use about 10 KG of black truffles every week!  Very impressive.  The cave is also very “compact”. After the tour, we were led to the dining room.   Both Wakako and I love Burgundy wines and we might have spent more time reading the wine list than the menu.  We soon reached a consensus – that we would order a Burgundy red.
Louis Roederer Brut Premier - Cuvée Sélectionnée Par Le Restaurant l'Ambroisie

Louis Roederer Brut Premier – Cuvée Sélectionnée Par Le Restaurant l

Before having some wine, we also wanted to have some Champagne.  At l’Ambroisie, their house champagne is Louis Roederer Brut Premier.  It’s quite a good choice for an aperitif.  It’s not a heavy style champagne, but quite light and fresh.  Louis Roederer is a champagne house which is still run by a family and could be the most finanicially independent one.  Its own vineyards supply nearly 75% of its grape needs which is a major advantage for this house.  Plus, over 40% of Louis Roederer’s own vineyards are located in Côtes des Blanc, the finest area for Chardonnay.  The Louis Roederer Brut Premier is one of the most consistently good NV champagnes.
1999 Domaine Hervé Sigaut Chambolle-Musigny 1er Cru Les Sentiers Vieilles Vignes

1999 Domaine Hervé Sigaut Chambolle-Musigny 1er Cru Les Sentiers Vieilles Vignes

The Burgundy we chose was 1999 Domaine Hervé Sigaut Chambolle-Musigny 1er Cru Les Sentiers Vieilles Vignes. It’s a good choice for Wakako’s main course – Carré d’agneau au poivre, but not a perfect choice for my Feuilleté de truffe fraîche “bel humeur”.  A white Burgundy, i.e. Meursault would go better with black truffle than a Burgundy red.
Velouté de topinambours et noix de saint-jacques, émulsion de truffe

Velouté de topinambours et noix de saint-jacques, émulsion de truffe

Our amuse bouche was Velouté de topinambours et noix de saint-jacques, émulsion de truffe.  Well, it’s of course amazinigly good.  The saint-jacques was very tender, with that impeccable émulsion de truffe, I would say it’s a super luxerious amuse bouche.
Feuillantine de langoustines aux grains de sésame, sauce au curry

Feuillantine de langoustines aux grains de sésame, sauce au curry

For the entrée, Wakako had Feuillantine de langoustines aux grains de sésame, sauce au curry.  It’s a signature dish of l’Ambroisie. I had a little piece of Wakako’s langoustines, and it was so good.  The meat of the langoustines was al dente.  The sauce au curry was not attacking but elegant and the spiciness perfectly highlighted the sweetness of langoustines.  No wonder it’s always on the menu.
Escalopines de bar poelees, étuvée d'artichaut et truffe

Escalopines de bar poelees, étuvée d

I had “Escalopines de bar poelees, étuvée d’artichaut et truffe.”  The quality of the bar is top.  I wish the fish skin was quickly fried so it would taste crispy rather than too chewy. The étuvée d’artichaut et truffe was really great.  The sauce was so creamy and aromatic. You’d be so tempted to use the bread to dip the sauce and even wrap the plate so you wouldn’t miss any tiny drop of this seductive essence.After the entrée, we started to enjoy our red wine.  It was a very intense Chambolle.  I would say it’s the characteristic of the terroir “Le Sentiers”, the old vines, and the vintage “1999”.  Domaine Hervé Sigaut has practiced organic and biodynamic farming since 1992.  Its property is mainly located in Chambolle Musigny, including 3 spectacular old-vine parcels of Chambolle 1er Crus Les Fuées, Les Sentiers, and Noirots.  Les Sentiers is one of the premiers crus which lie under Bonnes-Mares.   Say, compared to another very admirable premier cru – Les Amoureuses, Les Sentiers has more muscle, but it’s true Chambolle.  The vintage 1999, needless to say, is a great vintage for Burgundy wines.  Put these elements altogether, this wine was indeed a great wine.  It still possessed a vivid life, and still young.  If I had another bottle of this wine, I would rather wait for another 10 years to drink it.  It will be incredible.

Feuilleté de truffe fraîche "bel humeur

Feuilleté de truffe fraîche

A "WOW" moment...

A”WOW” moment…

When my main course was served, it was really a “wow moment”.  Recall, I had ordered the Feuilleté de truffe fraîche “bel humeur,” a very famous signature dish at L’Ambroisie that consists of a perfect, very large black truffle sandwiching a perfect tranche of foie gras baked in pastry with black truffle sauce.  “Please cut the bel humeur from the middle, and take a deep breathe when the aromas come out…”, when the waiter said this to me, he also winked, which implied me to be prepared for this – you’re going to be blown away.  The shape of this Bel Humeur was so delicate and beautiful.  I felt quite guilty to use the knife to cut it or “destroy” this art piece. Well, after appreciating it enough with my eyes, I eventually had it cut.  And exactly as he said, the aromas blew up immediately.  Before this dish, I’d never had a whole black truffle like this.  Absolutely, it was a totally new experience to me.  I had the same thing at Ledoyen one month after dining at l’Ambroisie.  I have to say – L’Ambroisie’s Bel Humeur is much better!  I am not sure having had this Bel Humeur as a benchmark if I will ever be satisfied with any other.

Carré d'agneau au poivre

Carré d’agneau au poivre

Wakako’s carré d’agneau au poivre was also great. She claimed it’s one of the best d’agneau she ever had.  Well, the other one was from Pierre Gagnaire. I also had the pleasure to eat a little piece of it and needless to say, I would also rate it with the highest score so far.  Hugo Desnoyer (could be the best butcher in Paris) used to say – his toughest customer is Pacaud of l’Ambroisie. Pacaud has the highest standards of any chef.  Therefore, you can get the picture why l’Ambroisie can acquire these ingredients of supreme quality.

Tarte fine sablée au chocolat, glace à la vanille

Tarte fine sablée au chocolat, glace à la vanille

After enjoying the splendid main courses, Wakako and I went on desserts.  She had the signature dessert “Tarte fine sablée au chocolat, glace à la vanille”, and I chose “Biscuit chaud et sorbet à la mandarine”. Both were incredible.  I had a bite of Wakako’s Tarte fine sablee au chocolat and soon understood why it is be so admired.  The appearance of this tarte is not fancy at all.  It’s very simple.  But the taste is defintely not simple; and it’s velvet like.  The chocolate aromas are so rich and good.  What a nice ending of this great meal.
We were the last guests to leave the restaurant.  It was a truly memorable experience.  After the meal, I took a walk around Place des Vosges to keep enjoying that very beautiful afternoon.
Place des Vosges

Place des Vosges

The point of view of Bernard Pacaud about his/French cuisine –
“French cuisine is an amalgam of influences, just as my cuisine is…”
“Some products are so lovely, I’m afraid I’ll spoil them.  But it’s a question of touch and know-how.  You can see the Japanese guy doesn’t want to spoil the fish.  He has to scale it and filet it, but he wants to make it more beautiful than before.  That’s real cuisine too:  few ingredients, perfect cooking, and perfect seasoning.  The product must keep its nature flavor.  Maybe that’s my cuisine.  But it comes from what I learned with Peyrot and Brazier.”
– Bernard Pacaud, l’Ambroisie “Les secrets de cuisine de Bernard Pacaud”
The DVD of l'Ambroisie - Les Secrets de Cuisine de Bernard Pacaud

The DVD of l’Ambroisie – Les Secrets de Cuisine de Bernard Pacaud

(My 3rd time dining at l’Ambroisie will be posted at Part III)

France - Paris, Gastronomy

l’Ambroisie, la cuisine qui vient d’un grand coeur – Part I

October 24, 2008

l’Ambroisie, la cuisine qui vient d’un grand coeur

Part I

Le Restaurant l'Ambroisie

Le Restaurant l’Ambroisie

“If you asked 10 Parisians – what’s the best restaurant serving tradition French cuisine, 11 out 10 would answer you – l’Ambroisie.”

I suppose I am still at the age where when I find myself in certain great cities (or towns that are put on the map from having a truly great restaurant) I find myself almost unconsciously deciding to seek out the locations of these “temples”, not to arrive for a reservation, but just to feel what it is like to stand outside of them looking in and dreaming about what it will be like when I dine there.  And so it was 2 years ago, having just arrived in Paris, I went to the Place des Vosges and stood outside L’Ambroisie. Though I knew it is one of the best restaurants in France,  I didn’t realize that it is hidden in such a discreet corner at such a beautiful place.  It seemed have a magic to me, and I suddenly had a feeling telling me – I must come here at least once before I leave France.  And my wish came true:  I would experience four meals there before I moved back to Taiwan.

MY FIRST MEAL (A November White Truffle Lunch with my Aunt and Cousin)
The very first “touch” with l’Ambroisie was in November 2007, when my family came to visit me in Paris — especially good timing since it was white truffle season and the chef/owner, the great Bernard Pacaud, insists only on the best of the best ingredients (even when the ingredient is as rare and expensive as white truffles).   The situation in 2007 was the misfortune of a terrible season for white truffles, so the rarest of the rare that met the standards for L’Ambroisie were beyond exhorbitant.  I brought my camera to the lunch to photograph the beautiful plates of food.

For an ‘amuse bouche’ we were served rouget with leek and balsamic.  The skin was very crispy and the meat was extremely tender.

Parmentière de noix de saint-jacques au cresson, truffe blanche "O.Berluti".

Parmentière de noix de saint-jacques au cresson, truffe blanche

My aunt went for the Parmentière de noix de saint-jacques au cresson, truffe blanche “O.Berluti”.   I’ve been told the dish is named after a local Paris celebrity Olga Berluti, who creates the beautiful Berluti shoes that she sells from her boutique on the left bank.  The sliced white truffles were placed on top of the scallops (St-Jacques).  By the appearance of the white truffles, you could tell easily the quality is the top.  My aunt said the St-Jacques were executed very well and they retained their flavorful juices: the fresh sweetness of the St-Jacques.  The aromas of the white truffle are still well seared in my memory.  And I would say that egg could be the best company for white truffle.  The émulsion de cepes was also amazing.  The combination was just so perfect because of all of these great ingredients put together.
Œufs de poule brouillés à la truffe blanche, émulsion de cepes

Œufs de poule brouillés à la truffe blanche, émulsion de cepes

I ordered the “Œufs de poule brouillés à la truffe blanche, émulsion de cepes”.  I can say without hesitation that this was the best white truffle dish I have ever experienced in my life.  The aromas of the white truffle are still well seared in my memory.  And I would say that egg could be the best company for white truffle.  The émulsion de cepes was also amazing.  The combination was just so perfect because of all of these great ingredients put together.
Noix de ris de veau au céleri confit, râpé de châtaignes

Noix de ris de veau au céleri confit, râpé de châtaignes

For the main course, I ordered “Noix de ris de veau au céleri confit, râpé de châtaignes”.  La cuisson of this noix de ris was just perfect.  The texture was so chewingly soft.  The râpé de châtaigneswas also delicious, but it could be a bit too heavy if you finished all of it.  Well, I really wouldn’t mind if they gave me a little bit Œufs de poule brouillés à la truffe blanche, émulsion de cepes” as a side dish with this as well.

Agneau de Lozère en croute de noix, artichauts violets farcis à la ricotta

Agneau de Lozère en croute de noix, artichauts violets farcis à la ricotta

My cousin ordered “Agneau de Lozère en croute de noix, artichauts violets farcis à la ricotta”.  When she put the first piece of lamb in her mouth, she said “this is the best lamb I’ve ever had, so delicious…!”  To this day she still can’t forget the lamb she had at l’Ambroisie.  And the stuffed artichokes it came with are the most beautiful presentation of artichokes I have ever seen.
Suprême de volaille de Bresse aux écrevisse, turban de macaroni

Suprême de volaille de Bresse aux écrevisse, turban de macaroni

On the other hand, my aunt’s “Suprême de volaille de Bresse aux écrevisse, turban de macaroni” was unfortunately not executed perfectly.   The texture looked dry, but she was still quite satisfied with that Bresse. Well, the part of the Bresse she ate was chicken brest.  Most Asian people prefer chicken legs to brests, because the legs are more tender and juicy.  But it seems most Western people like the breast the most.
Strates de nougatine à la poire, sorbet "William"

Strates de nougatine à la poire, sorbet “William” Arlettes caramélisées au fromage blanc, citrons confits

When it came to decide a dessert, my aunt was too full to have something sweet.  So my cousin and I ordered Strates de nougatine à la poire, sorbet “William” and Arlettes caramélisées au fromage blanc, citrons confits.   Strates de nougatine à la poire, sorbet “William” was a very classic one.  My Arlettes caramélisées au fromage blanc, citrons confits was quite light.  The citrons confits had a pleasant tinge of bitterness which balanced well the sweetness.
The whole meal was exceptional, and I found l’Ambroisie was really my style.  We all enjoyed the dining room.  It’s not as big and glittering as Le Meurice (we had been to Le Meurice 2 days ago before l’Ambroisie), but it’s very classic with a more personal touch.  L’Ambroisie’s cuisine looks simple (less “fancy” than Le Meurice), but you could tell the work behind every dish is definitely not easy!  I even bought the DVD – Frederic Laffont’s film L’Ambroisie, les secrets de cuisine de Bernard Pacaud, and have watched it at least 5 times.  Of the dvd documentaries done on Pacaud, Roellinger, Gagaire, and Bras (all of which I have watched multiple times), I enjoy the Pacaud one the most.  The music in the L’Ambroisie documentary is particularly wonderful.  Of all these documentaries, I feel you get the most personal experience watching Bernard Pacaud.
The dining room of l'Ambroisie

The dining room of l’Ambroisie

(My 2nd time dining at l’Ambroisie will be posted at Part II)